The Value of Startup CEO’s Sitting on One Other Startup Board



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I recently wrote a post titled All CEOs Should Be An Outside Director For One Company.

Mark Suster from GRP historically disagreed, saying “I’ve always believed startup founders need extreme focus on only their company to succeed.”

But my post changed his mind and today he wrote an awesome post today titled Should You Really Sit on Other Boards When You’re a Startup Founder?

If you are a startup founder or a CEO, I encourage you to go read each post and think about it, especially the day before and the day after your next board meeting.


Cooley Invests Heavily In Los Angeles



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A part of the Boulder Thesis, which I explain in depth in Startup Communities, is that startup communities have to be led by entrepreneurs. Everyone else is a feeder into the startup community. Both leaders and feeders are important – they are just different.

Service providers, such as law firms, are feeders. Law firms with extensive experience working with startups can have a huge positive impact of a startup community. We have several in Boulder – one of the most impactful has been Cooley, especially Mike Platt and his team.

This morning Cooley announced that it is entering the Los Angeles startup community in a big way. Mark Suster explains the story, and the reason it’s such an important move, on his blog in a post titled Here are More Signs that LA Tech is Moving to the Next Level

It’s a great example of how a professional services firm can play a key role as a feeder into a startup community.


Why Do Tech Entrepreneurs Love Cities?



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Mark Suster has an awesome post up titled Why Technology is Driving More Urban RenewalHe talks about what is happening with startup communities in San Francisco (the city, not “Silicon Valley”, “the peninsula”, or “the bay area”). He touches on New York City and references a great post by Fred Wilson titled Cause & Effect. He touches on the VC migration in Boston from “the suburbs” (Waltham) to Cambridge and downtown Boston. And he signals that his firm – GRP – is moving from the startup wasteland of Beverly Hills to the startup rich neighborhood of Santa Monica / Venice Beach.